Nureddin Özel, ŞEHİR History Master Degree Student, becomes the first in the Special İRAM Awards for Thesis of the Year
5/17/2019
M. Nureddin Özel, ŞEHİR student, became the first in the category of master degree thesis with his study called, "Ambassadors, Spies, Captives, Merchants and Travelers: Ottoman Information Networks in the East, 1736-1747".

M. Nureddin Özel, the student of İstanbul Şehir University, applied to the Thesis Awards given in order to support the studies about Iran in Turkey with his thesis called "Ambassadors, Spies, Captives, Merchants and Travelers: Ottoman Information Networks in the East, 1736-1747", and he became the first in the category of master degree thesis. The thesis discusses the information networks of Ottoman in the East during the reign of Nadir Shah in Iran.

M. Nureddin Özel, the student of History Master Degree in the İstanbul Şehir University Graduate School of Social Sciences, wrote his thesis under the advisory of Prof. Engin Akarlı, and became the first in the awards of thesis organized by İRAM (Center for Iranian Studies). M. Nureddin Özel applied to the Thesis Awards given in order to support the studies about Iran in Turkey with his thesis called "Ambassadors, Spies, Captives, Merchants and Travelers: Ottoman Information Networks in the East, 1736-1747", and he became the first in the category of master degree thesis. The thesis discusses the information networks of Ottoman in the East during the reign of Nadir Shah in Iran. 

​The thesis of Nureddin Özel sheds light on the critical and important phase of Ottoman-Iran relationships, that is, during the period when Nadir Shah reigned in Iran from 1736 to 1747. The research is based on two approaches, descriptive and analytical. The descriptive side of the study aims to show how and when intelligence arrived in Istanbul. It emphasizes singular cases of agencies who convey (and process) information, such as ambassadors, spies, captives, merchants, couriers, and travelers, but with due effort to depict the clear and implicit connections and links among them. It also sheds light on Anatolia, Iraq, the Hedjaz, Iran, and India, and on individuals who were in contact with the Ottoman central and local officials. At the analytical level, this research points to the tensions and complexities of policy making. It points to friendly or hostile relations among certain Ottoman agents and how two political factions, influenced the making of the Ottoman government's Iran policy in the 1730s and 1740s. The rich sources in the thesis of Nureddin Özel also stand out. Not only is the study based on dominantly Ottoman sources, but also uses sources from other languages. And these made this thesis well-searched, well-written and informative.